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Even Calabar’s Marian market has lost the tolerance and rhythm of a rural market.  It is almost completely urbanised.  A sleight of hand will be employed in selling you second grade produce and the vendor on the next day will show no remorse if you should return to challenge the integrity of the purchase.

The dawadawa below is from the Old woman who sells soup condiments in the courtyard at the front of the market. The difference to the Ebu dawadawa is blatant.
One circle of the Marian market dawadawa costs the same as the whole stack from Ebu; N100.  The Marian dawadawa is thin, dry and discoloured.  The Ebu dawadawa breaks off like moist thick chocolate.  It is a generous wedge and the smell of sweetness on it is very loud.
A friend’s mother from Delta State burns her dawadawa before putting it in the pot of soup.  The oils seep to the surface and a crust is formed.  The aroma of the dawadawa is further sweetened.

The circle of dawadawa is simply hung on the end of a fork and held high over the gas burner and moved around until all the sides of the dawadawa are treated with fire.
The dawadawa is left to cool and then broken into pieces and placed in a dry mill.
It is ground until it is the consistency of coffee grains.  It is then added to the soup.
I find that I like to use dawadawa like this if I am making soup for guests and I am not sure what their relationship to dawadawa is.  I love to see individual locust beans on the face of my soup but I know many people who are immediately put off by the sight of the beans.  

I also like the texture of individual beans but I have to admit that this way of using the dawadawa gives much more flavour to the soup.
Long-w-throat